SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION REQUIRED FOR NEW 140E

A.          Bulletin listing:
1.          Math
2.          140E
3.          Calculus with Engineering Applications 1
4.          Calc Engr Apps 1
5.          4
6.          Functions; limits; analytic geometry; derivatives; differentials, applications; integrals,
applications.
7.          Math 22 and 26; or Math 40; or Math 41; or satisfactory performance in the mathematics
proficiency examination.

B.          Course Outline:

This course enriches the regular Math 140 syllabus by adding weekly applied problems, a small number of laboratory sessions, and a major group projects for which both written and oral presentations are required. It is a rigorous calculus course with additional motivation and applications in the engineering sciences, designed to enhance the student's problem solving skills and their understanding of how calculus is applied to real world problems. The core material is the same as Math 140 enabling some common exam questions.

Textbooks: "Calculus and Analytic Geometry. 9t" edition", by Thomas and Finney. AddisonWesley.
1) Limits and Continuity
2) Derivatives
3) Applications of Derivatives
4) Integration
5) Applications of Integration
J. Jacobsen and S. Tavener are responsible for the development of the course.

C.          Justification Statement:
1. Instructional, Educational, and Course Objectives

The mathematical component of this course is the same as that of Math 140. Math 140E is designed to motivate calculus within an engineering context, enhance problem solving skills, strengthen technical writing and oral presentation skills, and to introduce students to working in groups.
2. Evaluation Methods

The achievement of the educational objectives will be assessed through quizzes, weekly applied problems, two midterms, a group project, and a final exam.

3. Relationship/Linkage to Other Courses

A separate designation for the engineering sections of Math 140 is requested in response to legitimate concerns expressed by the students enrolled in pilot sections of this course. The same topics are covered as in the standard Math 140 classes but the emphasis differs. Further, the weekly applied problems (for which comprehensive answers are required), laboratory sessions, group projects and oral presentations effectively distinguish these sections from the other Math 140 classes.

4. Relationship to Major, Option, Minor, or General Education

Math 140E will provide an alternative to Math 140 for engineering majors. This course addresses the additional needs of engineering majors with regard to problem formulation and the interpretation of their mathematical "solutions".

5. Frequency of Offering and Enrollment

Six sections every Fall semester.

D.          Fall Semester 2000.



SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION REQUIRED FOR NEW 141E

A.          Bulletin listing:
1.          Math
2.          141E
3.          Calculus with Engineering Applications 11
4.          Calc Engr Apps II
5.          4
6.          Integration, applications; sequences and series; parametric equations, application.
7.          Math 140, 140A, 140B, or 140E; or the consent of the instructor.

B.          Course Outline:

This course enriches the regular Math 141 syllabus by adding weekly applied problems, a small number of laboratory sessions, and a major group projects for which both written and oral presentations are required. It is a rigorous calculus course with additional motivation and applications in the engineering sciences, designed to enhance the student's problem solving skills and their understanding of how calculus is applied to real world problems. The core material is the same as Math 141 enabling some common exam questions.

Textbook: " Calculus and Analytic Geometry. 9th edition", by Thomas and Finney. AddisonWesley.
1) Transcendental Functions
2) Techniques of Integration
3) Infinite Series
4) Parametric Equations
5) Applications
J. Jacobsen and S. Tavener are responsible for the development of the course.

C.          Justification Statement:
1. Instructional, Educational, and Course Objectives

The mathematical component of this course is essentially the same as that of Math 141. Math 141E is designed to motivate calculus within an engineering context, enhance problem solving skills, strengthen technical writing and oral presentation skills, and to introduce students to working in groups.
2. Evaluation Methods

The achievement of the educational objectives will be assessed through quizzes, weekly applied problems, two midterms, a group project, and a final exam.

3. Relationship/Linkage to Other Courses

A separate designation for the engineering sections of Math 141 is requested in response to the legitimate concerns expressed by the students enrolled in pilot sections of this course. The same topics are covered as in the standard Math 141 classes but the emphasis is considerably different. Further, the weekly applied problems (for which comprehensive answers are required), laboratory sessions, group projects and oral presentations effectively distinguish these sections from the other Math 141 classes.

4. Relationship to Major, Option, Minor, or General Education

Math 141E will provide an alternative to Math 141 for engineering majors. This course addresses the additional needs of engineering majors with regard to problem formulation and the interpretation of their mathematical "solutions".

5. Frequency of Offering and Enrollment

Six sections every Spring semester.

D.          Fall Semester 2000


SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION REQUIRED FOR NEW 140L

A.          Bulletin listing:

1.          Math
2.          140L
3.          Mathematica for Calculus I
4.          Mathematica I
5.          1
6.          Problem solving using Mathematica in a UNIX environment.

7.          Math 22 and 26; or Math 40; or Math 41. Can be taken concurrently with Math 140.

B.          Course Outline:

The purpose of the course is to introduce Mathematica as a tool for problem solving. The goal of the course is to teach the students how to access the full symbolic, numeric, graphic, and text capabilities of Mathematica. The first half of the course will focus on the syntax of Mathematica and the UNIX operating system. The second half will focus on using Mathematica to explore fundamental ideas from the Math 140 curriculum. It is important to emphasize that the principle goal is not to use the symbolic and graphical capabilities of Mathematica to demonstrate the calculus, but to teach students how to use Mathematica on their own to study calculus. The emphasis is on students writing their own code and not simply pushing buttons in existing notebooks. Students may continue, with more sophisticated applications, in Math 141 L.

Textbooks: Lab/Worksheets will be handed out.

1) Orientation, The Operating System

2) Built In Objects, Scientific Functions, and Basic Plotting

3) Fundamentals of Arithmetic, Square Roots, and Exponents

4) Symbols, Strings, Sets, and Lists

5) Equality, Inequality, Logical Operations, and Decisions

6) Creating Functions, Precision Calculations, and Advanced Plotting

7) Basic Programming, Recursive Programs

8) Procedures and Loops

9) Arrays and Lists, Discrete Logistics Model

10) Solving Equations, Substitution Rules

11) Rates of Change, Limits

12) Derivatives, Critical Points

13) Applications
J. Jacobsen and S. Tavener are responsible for development of the course.

C.          Justification Statement:

1. Instructional, Educational, and Course Objectives

Students are expected to learn the fundamentals of programming in Mathematica. This includes understanding how to manipulate the symbolic, numeric, graphic, and text capabilities to their benefit. It is likely that the students will continue to use these tools throughout their studies and careers. In particular, their experience in this class will improve their ability to learn other computer algebra systems such as Matlab and Maple.

2. Evaluation Methods

The achievement of the educational objectives will be assessed through class participation and weekly worksheets.

3. Relationship/Linkage to Other Courses

Ideally students will be concurrently enrolled in one of the variations of Math 140, although this is not necessary. In particular, students enrolled in the proposed new course Math 140E will have the opportunity to use Mathematica for further exploration and insight into the applied problems and projects from the course. Instructors from other sections of Math 140 may want to offer additional optional course material for any of their students enrolled in Math 140E.

4. Relationship to Major, Option, Minor, or General Education

This course is open to all majors. The only prerequisite is an interest in computer algebra systems and calculus. It is hoped that the students will use their knowledge from this course to study any mathematical problems that arise in their course of study. For this reason it is expected to draw students from across the undergraduate curriculum.

5. Facilities and Technology Needs

The course requires a technology classroom with sufficiently many computers running Mathematica to accommodate 20 to 30 students.

6. Frequency of Offering and Enrollment

We suggest that the course be offered every year. It is reasonable to expect a class enrollment of 30 students. In fact, if the course catches on, it is reasonable to expect the need for several sections.

D.          Fall Semester 2000.


SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION REQUIRED FOR NEW 141L

A.          Bulletin listing:

1.          Math
2.          140L
3.          Mathematica for Calculus I
4.          Mathematica I
5.          1
6.          Problem solving using Mathematica in a UNIX environment.

7.          Math 22 and 26; or Math 40; or Math 41. Can be taken concurrently with Math 140.

B.          Course Outline:

The purpose of the course is to introduce Mathematica as a tool for problem solving. The goal of the course is to teach the students how to access the full symbolic, numeric, graphic, and text capabilities of Mathematica. The first half of the course will focus on the syntax of Mathematica and the UNIX operating system. The second half will focus on using Mathematica to explore fundamental ideas from the Math 140 curriculum. It is important to emphasize that the principle goal is not to use the symbolic and graphical capabilities of Mathematica to demonstrate the calculus, but to teach students how to use Mathematica on their own to study calculus. The emphasis is on students writing their own code and not simply pushing buttons in existing notebooks. Students may continue, with more sophisticated applications, in Math 141 L.

Textbooks: Lab/Worksheets will be handed out.

1) Orientation, The Operating System

2) Built In Objects, Scientific Functions, and Basic Plotting

3) Fundamentals of Arithmetic, Square Roots, and Exponents

4) Symbols, Strings, Sets, and Lists

5) Equality, Inequality, Logical Operations, and Decisions

6) Creating Functions, Precision Calculations, and Advanced Plotting

7) Basic Programming, Recursive Programs

8) Procedures and Loops

9) Arrays and Lists, Discrete Logistics Model

10) Solving Equations, Substitution Rules

11) Rates of Change, Limits

12) Derivatives, Critical Points

13) Applications
J. Jacobsen and S. Tavener are responsible for development of the course.

C.          Justification Statement:

1. Instructional, Educational, and Course Objectives

Students are expected to learn the fundamentals of programming in Mathematica. This includes understanding how to manipulate the symbolic, numeric, graphic, and text capabilities to their benefit. It is likely that the students will continue to use these tools throughout their studies and careers. In particular, their experience in this class will improve their ability to learn other computer algebra systems such as Matlab and Maple.

2. Evaluation Methods

The achievement of the educational objectives will be assessed through class participation and weekly worksheets.

3. Relationship/Linkage to Other Courses

Ideally students will be concurrently enrolled in one of the variations of Math 140, although this is not necessary. In particular, students enrolled in the proposed new course Math 140E will have the opportunity to use Mathematica for further exploration and insight into the applied problems and projects from the course. Instructors from other sections of Math 140 may want to offer additional optional course material for any of their students enrolled in Math 140E.

4. Relationship to Major, Option, Minor, or General Education

This course is open to all majors. The only prerequisite is an interest in computer algebra systems and calculus. It is hoped that the students will use their knowledge from this course to study any mathematical problems that arise in their course of study. For this reason it is expected to draw students from across the undergraduate curriculum.

5. Facilities and Technology Needs

The course requires a technology classroom with sufficiently many computers running Mathematica to accommodate 20 to 30 students.

6. Frequency of Offering and Enrollment

We suggest that the course be offered every year. It is reasonable to expect a class enrollment of 30 students. In fact, if the course catches on, it is reasonable to expect the need for several sections.

D.          Fall Semester 2000.